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Opinions

Letter to the Editor

I read with interest in the August 2020 edition of Southern Living magazine that San Marcos was named among the six “smartest places to retire” in the country. I was not too surprised, as I also consider our Central Texas location ideal, our beautiful San Marcos River enchanting, and the benefits of living in a university town numerous. What occurred to me, however, was that our city doesn’t offer much for those who prefer to live close to downtown and the university, enjoying the options of walking to shop, dine out, or attend functions at the Texas State University. The sad truth is that we lack a variety of housing options for those older citizens who might investigate moving here. We currently have established neighborhoods close to the downtown area and beyond; relatively new housing developments on the outskirts of town; and a plethora of apartment complexes for university students and other young people. What we lack is the option of apartments or condominiums for retirees who might prefer a more “walkable life” in San Marcos. The developers of Lindsey Hill saw that demographic, as well as young professionals, as the most likely prospects for their development … a contribution to our fine city.

Encouraging support for SMTX Housing 4 All

We would like to draw a parallel line between where we today find ourselves as a nation, working hard to right the long-standing housing inequalities American citizens continue to experience, and how local appointed and elected leaders make decisions that either eliminate or perpetuate these inequalities. When city leaders refuse to take action or worse, actively resist strategies/opportunities that would support the creation of affordable housing types, the overall health and welfare of the community is negatively affected. Housing is a human issue.

Analysis: Shopping for students without schoolrooms, Texas is spending $250 million to narrow the digital divide

One of every six public school students in Texas does not have access to high-speed internet, and 30% of them don’t have a “dedicated and adequate learning device” — a laptop or tablet computer — according to Texas educators who answered a voluntary state survey earlier this year.

Emphatically disagreeing with last week's Daily Record editorial

I write this in disgust after reading Mr. Winter’s (and apparently, the entire Daily Record's) opinion piece published on July 26, 2020 and the narrow perspective presented. As the publisher of this paper, he put a picture of himself in the Sunday paper with an ominous headline, overtly attempting to instill fear while simultaneously claiming that “plain old fear” is what is holding our community back. This is a classic example of why folks complain of media bias! By the way, I’m also pretty sure that guy doesn’t even live in San Marcos but rather Wimberley or Woodcreek or whatever, though, you know, he’s worried about “our” future here in San Marcos.

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San Marcos Record

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